Bachelor of Science in Natural Sciences

Admission Requirements

  • Satisfy the Application and Admission Requirements for Baccalaureate Programs.
  • Declare the major (see major requirements) and select one of three options: General Sciences, Pre-health Professions or Environmental Sciences. To declare the Bachelor of Science in Natural Sciences as their major, students must meet with an advisor and then apply to be accepted into the major. To schedule an advising session, contact the Department of Biological Sciences. At the advising session students are required to:
  1. Choose one of the three options.
  2. File a preliminary program of study with the Department of Biological Sciences.

Academic Requirements

To graduate with a BS in Natural Sciences, the student must complete all courses covered under major requirements with a grade of C or better. All prerequisites for courses used to meet the natural sciences degree requirements must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students who audit a course intended to meet the natural sciences degree requirements or who are unable to earn a grade of C or better in the course may repeat the course. Students who audit or are unable to earn a grade of C or better in a lower-division (100- or 200-level) Biology (BIOL) course may repeat the course two additional times on a space-available basis. Students who audit or are unable to earn a grade of C or better in an upper-division (300- or 400-level) BIOL course may repeat the course one additional time on a space-available basis. Students repeating a BIOL course are required to complete all components of that course during the semester in which the course is retaken. When repeating a course with a lecture and laboratory component, both components must be repeated. Students enrolled in a BIOL laboratory must attend lab the first week of class or they may be administratively dropped.

Graduation Requirements

Major Requirements

  1. No more than 6 credits may come from courses designated as A495, A498 and A499 combined, with no more than 2 credits from A495.
  2. No more than 4 credits may be A492, with no more than 2 credits from the same discipline.
  3. Courses not listed as approved for the BS In Natural Sciences may be considered by petition, which should be signed by an advisor.
  4. It is strongly recommended that any changes to the preliminary program be reviewed by an advisor to ensure that the final program of study will meet all requirements for graduation.
  5. Students must submit a final Program of Study-Natural Sciences Degree form signed by their advisor to both the Office of the Registrar and the Department of Biological Sciences during the semester prior to the semester in which they plan to graduate. All courses listed in the form must be approved by the formal advisor before submitting the form to the Office of the Registrar and the Department of Biological Sciences. 

Environmental Sciences Option

BIOL A108Principles and Methods in Biology6
CHEM A105
A105L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM A106
A106L
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
ENVI A211Environmental Science: Systems and Processes3
ENVI A212Living on Earth: Introduction to Environmental Studies3
GEOL A111
A111L
Physical Geology
and Physical Geology Laboratory
4
or GEOL A121 Physical Geology for Science and Engineering Majors
GEOL A221Historical Geology4
Select 52 credits of degree electives, of which 32 must be upper-division credits, from the following course lists.52
Natural and Physical Sciences
Complete a minimum of 20 credits from the following:
Astrobiology
Fundamentals of Oceanography
Fundamentals of Oceanography Laboratory
Introduction to Complexity
Fundamentals of Cell Biology
Experiential Learning: Cell Biology and Genetics
Principles of Genetics
Principles of Ecology
Experiential Learning: Ecology and Evolution
Principles of Evolution
Principles of Animal Physiology
Experiential Learning: Animal Physiology
Principles of Plant Physiology
Experiential Learning: Plant Physiology
Experiential Learning: Microscopical Tissue Technique
Experiential Learning: Biostatistics
Experiential Learning: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)
Comparative Animal Physiology
Fish Physiology
Ichthyology
Marine Invertebrate Biology
Marine Mammal Biology
Plant Diversity and Evolution
Animal Behavior
Experiential Learning: Animal Behavior
Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Fish Ecology
Wildlife Population Dynamics and Management
Biogeography
Conservation Biology
Ecotoxicology
Tundra and Taiga Ecosystems
Biological Oceanography
Physiological Plant Ecology
Ecological and Conservation Genetics
Marine Biology
Spatial Ecology
Exploration Ecology
Experiential Learning: Exploration Ecology Field Study
Evolutionary Ecology
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Population Genetics and Evolutionary Processes
Selected Lecture Topics in Biology
Selected Laboratory Topics in Biology
Undergraduate Seminar
Internship in the Biological Sciences
Individual Research
Senior Thesis
Principles of Inorganic Chemistry
Quantitative Analysis
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Physical Chemistry II
Biophysical Chemistry
Instrumental Methods
Principles of Biochemistry I
Principles of Biochemistry II
Biochemistry Laboratory
Environmental Chemistry
Undergraduate Seminar
Individual Research
Environmental Geology
Environmental Geology Laboratory
Introductory Topics in Geology
Volcanology
Mineralogy
Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
Geology of Ore Deposits
Structural Geology
Geomorphology
Geochemistry
Anchorage Field Studies
Kenai Peninsula Field Studies
Geologic Field Studies
Sedimentology
Stratigraphy
Sedimentary Petrology Laboratory
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Glacial and Quaternary Geology
Permafrost
Geoarchaeology
Environmental Geochemistry
Environmental Geophysics
Geologic Field Methods
Alaskan Field Investigations
Geologic Field Investigations
Advanced Topics in Geology
Geology Seminar
Geology Internship
Student Research
Senior Thesis
Life on Earth
Concepts and Processes: Natural Sciences
Microbial Biology
Experiential Learning: Microbial Biology
Microbial Physiology
Pathogenic Microbiology
Experiential Learning: Pathogenic Microbiology
Microbial Diversity
Microbial Ecology
Microbial Biotechnology
Microbial Genetics
Experiential Learning: Microbial Ecology
Geomicrobiology
Basic Physics I
and Basic Physics I Laboratory *
General Physics I
and General Physics I Laboratory
Basic Physics II
and Basic Physics II Laboratory *
General Physics II
and General Physics II Laboratory
Modern Physics
Math and Computational Skills
Complete a minimum of 15 credits from the following:
Computer Programming (Languages Vary)
Java Programming
Visual Basic .NET Programming
Computer Programming I
Object-Oriented Programming I
Data Structures and Algorithms
Automata, Algorithms and Complexity
Database Systems
Computer Graphics
Artificial Intelligence
Evolutionary Computing
Geodesy and Map Projections
Image Analysis
GIS and Remote Sensing for Natural Resources
Coastal Mapping
Spatial Data Management
Spatial Analysis
Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Ordinary Differential Equations
Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Introduction to Geometries
Discrete Methods
Linear Algebra
Analysis of Several Variables
Introduction to Real Analysis
Stochastic Processes
Mathematical Statistics I
Mathematical Statistics II
Introduction to Complex Analysis
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Statistics for the Sciences
Probability and Statistics
Intermediate Statistics for the Sciences
Scientific Sampling
Regression Analysis
Analysis of Variance
Time Series Analysis
Multivariate Statistics
Selected Topics in Statistics
Social Sciences
Complete a minimum of 9 credits from the following:
Introduction to Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology
Biological Anthropology
Native North Americans
Applied Anthropology
Evolution of Humans and Disease
Introduction to Civic Engagement
Special Topics in Civic Engagement
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Environmental Economics and Policy
The Economy of Alaska
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Natural Resource Economics
Environmental Ethics
Environmental Planning and Problem Solving
Topics in Environment and Society
Local Places/Global Regions: An Introduction to Geography
People, Places, and Ecosystems
Introduction to Sociology
Environmental Sociology
Total Credits80
*

Students cannot get credit for both PHYS A123/PHYS A123L and PHYS A211/PHYS A211L or PHYS A124/PHYS A124L and PHYS A212/PHYS A212L

Pre-Health Professions Option

BIOL A108Principles and Methods in Biology6
CHEM A105
A105L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM A106
A106L
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
PHYS A123
A123L
Basic Physics I
and Basic Physics I Laboratory
4
PHYS A124
A124L
Basic Physics II
and Basic Physics II Laboratory
4
Complete 58 credits of degree electives, of which a minimum of 32 must be upper division, from the following course lists:58
Natural Sciences
Complete a minimum of 24 credits from the following:
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Introduction to Complexity
Introductory Microbiology for Health Sciences
Microbial Biology
and Experiential Learning: Microbial Biology
Fundamentals of Cell Biology
Experiential Learning: Cell Biology and Genetics
Principles of Genetics
Principles of Animal Physiology
Experiential Learning: Animal Physiology
Vertebrate Biology
Experiential Learning: Vertebrate Biology
Experiential Learning: Microscopical Tissue Technique
Experiential Learning: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)
Behavioral Endocrinology
Neurophysiology
Chronobiology
Comparative Animal Physiology
Applied Kinesiology and Exercise Physiology
Human Genome
Experiential Learning: Bioinformatics
Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
Molecular Biology
Molecular Biology of Cancer
Metals in Biology
Experiential Learning: Molecular Biology
Immunology
Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates
Population Genetics and Evolutionary Processes
Selected Lecture Topics in Biology
Selected Laboratory Topics in Biology
Undergraduate Seminar
Internship in the Biological Sciences
Individual Research
Quantitative Analysis
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Biophysical Chemistry
Instrumental Methods
Principles of Biochemistry I
Principles of Biochemistry II
Biochemistry Laboratory
Undergraduate Seminar
Individual Research
Microbial Physiology
Pathogenic Microbiology
Experiential Learning: Pathogenic Microbiology
Microbial Biotechnology
Microbial Genetics
Virology
Social Sciences
Complete a minimum of 15 credits from the following:
Introduction to Anthropology
Biological Anthropology
Psychological Anthropology
Modern Human Biological Diversity
Evolution of Humans and Disease
Medical Anthropology
Food and Nutrition: An Anthropological Perspective
Selected Topics in Anthropology
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to Environmental Health
Core Concepts in the Health Sciences
Introduction to Global Health
Introduction to Epidemiology
Senior Seminar: Contemporary Health Policy
Biomedical Ethics
General Psychology
Death and Dying
Lifespan Development
Statistics for Psychology
Statistics for Psychology Lab
Research Methods in Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Learning and Cognition
Perception
Personality
Behavioral Neuroscience
Foundations of Modern Psychology
Conducting Research in Psychology
Clinical Psychology
Evolutionary Psychology
Adult Development and Aging
Interventions for Challenging Behavior
Health Psychology
Individual Research
Math and Computational Skills
Complete a minimum of 9 credits from the following:
Applied Calculus for Managerial and Social Sciences
Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Ordinary Differential Equations
Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Introduction to Geometries
Discrete Methods
Linear Algebra
Analysis of Several Variables
Introduction to Real Analysis
Stochastic Processes
Mathematical Statistics I
Mathematical Statistics II
Introduction to Complex Analysis
Partial Differential Equations
Selected Topics in Mathematics
Individual Research
Applied Statistics for the Sciences
Probability and Statistics
Intermediate Statistics for the Sciences
Scientific Sampling
Regression Analysis
Analysis of Variance
Time Series Analysis
Multivariate Statistics
Selected Topics in Statistics
Total Credits80

General Sciences Option

BIOL A108Principles and Methods in Biology6
CHEM A105
A105L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM A106
A106L
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Laboratory
4
GEOL A111
A111L
Physical Geology
and Physical Geology Laboratory
4
GEOL A221Historical Geology4
PHYS A123
A123L
Basic Physics I
and Basic Physics I Laboratory
4
or PHYS A211
A211L
General Physics I
and General Physics I Laboratory
PHYS A124
A124L
Basic Physics II
and Basic Physics II Laboratory
4
or PHYS A212
A212L
General Physics II
and General Physics II Laboratory
Complete an additional 50 credits of degree electives. The credits may come from the following course lists:50
Environmental Sciences Option Course Lists (see above)
Pre-Health Professions Option Course Lists (see above)
Solar System Astronomy
Solar System Astronomy Laboratory
Stars, Galaxies and Cosmology
Stars, Galaxies and Cosmology Laboratory
Electromagnetics
Electromagnetics II
Intermediate Classical Mechanics
Simulation of Physical Systems
Quantum Mechanics
Statistical and Thermal Physics
Individual Research
At least two of the following disciplines must be represented at the upper-division level: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, statistics
Total Credits80

A minimum of 120 credits is required for the degree, of which 42 credits must be upper division.

Biological Sciences Exit Examination

All BS Natural Sciences majors are required to complete a nationally standardized exit examination during the semester immediately prior to or during the semester they intend to graduate. There is no minimum score required for graduation. 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

Students graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Natural Sciences will be able to:

  • Demonstrate their knowledge of the central conceptual models used in the major thematic areas of natural sciences
  • Identify problems, devise solutions and communicate solutions effectively